Ex 2.6 Wide Aperture, Long Focal Length

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All the above are taken with 50mm (100mm 35-Equiv) Olympus Zuiko, a legacy lens which fits my Micro 4/3 camera with an adaptor.  Shutter speeds between 1/500 and 1/1000, aperture f1.8 – f2.8  With this lens wide open the plane of focus is very shallow, a few centimeters on objects which are a metre or two away.  Focussing is manual, aided by the magnification function available via the viewfinder.

The wide aperture has the effect of throwing the background right out of focus rendering it as just a blur in most cases and the same can happen to objects closer to.  These are my selection from contacts below.

Composing the out-of-focus parts isn’t easy; I think it is important to exclude any undefined highlight areas such as glimpses of bright sky especially where they occur at the edge of the frame. With this aesthetic code you always seem to end up shooting past or through, but it does direct attention to the centre of interest.

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Ex 2.7 Wide angle & small aperture

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All images taken with Olympus 12-40mm zoom at f22 to f16 and shutter speeds of between 1/4’ and 1/30’

Using these shorter focal lengths affects the perspective of objects which are close to the camera; they appear much larger compared to the background content, sometimes dramatically so.  The 12mm end of this lens is 24mm equivalent due to the cameras small sensor and would probably be considered a medium wide-angle.

With the lens stopped right down the amount of light being transmitted is greatly reduced, requiring much longer exposure times.  Had there been any movement in these frames there would probably have been noticeable motion blur.  As it is, holding the camera steady is a problem as 1/30’ and lower is too slow for handholding.  The inbuilt image stabilisation helps but resting the camera on a steady surface certainly improves matters.

 

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Ex 2.5 Depth of Field

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Focussing on a near point throws the areas behind it out of focus. When focussing on a further point, although the near areas are out of focus, the range of in-focus areas is greater.  In the above images a  large aperture (f1.8) empasisies the effect.

The point of focus affects the composition by directing attention to the clearer areas. Unfocussed foreground is generally less appealing than the converse, but it can be used to good effect.

Square Mile–Rework & Reflection

Following Tutor suggestions I reprised some of the shots I had made for the Square Mile brief.  As mentioned elsewhere, I approached the original assignment by deciding what I was going to photograph, in some detail, then going to get the images.  In considering a rework I wish I had been less prescriptive, maybe conformed to the plan but then spent more time sauntering around waiting to ‘get my eye in’.  Continue reading “Square Mile–Rework & Reflection”

Eye tracks

Here are some possible ‘eye tracks’ which may result from the placement of the point object. I have no way of knowing whether they would be true for any number of people but they seem plausible, based on my assumption that the eye of the viewer is most likely to be drawn to the lighter, shinier object first. Having started there, it may be that a connection is established with the next object ‘further into’ the frame and having examined that, other similar objects may attract attention. Continue reading “Eye tracks”